Paying Attention

I’ve been on a journey into a new world of people and thinking, a group that I previously thought of as “others”.  It’s the LGBTQ community, of which my daughter has become a part of since she came out. The good news is that I’ve found plenty of Love in God’s storehouse that overflows for all.  The bad news is that I’ve had to confront a lot of things in myself to get there.

Well, actually both of those news stories are good.

There’s a special kind of challenge for a kid who grows up suppressing something they discover inside themselves, with few role models.  I’ve had to ask myself how I’ve been a part of Continue reading “Paying Attention”

The Half-life of Reform

Walking westward, finally closing in on the spires guiding me like the Bethlehem star, I was in for a disappointing surprise…

“I keep thinking what good wine and beer I have at home as well as a beautiful wife, or should I say boss?”  Cranach-Luther

The town of Wittenberg is a thousand years old, but took nearly half that time to produce the famous reformer who wrote this about his wife.  The half millennia since have seen Martin Luther’s thinking spread worldwide, including the little church in Florida via Scotland where it set the tone for my upbringing.  By that time Continue reading “The Half-life of Reform”

Wedding Legos

“It may be working, just not for everyone.”

What a strong narrative of marriage and family life is woven into the local church.  It’s surprising given that both Jesus and the apostle Paul were single.

A community wedding under the shade of century old oaks yielded a new “Mr. & Mrs.” this week, in a hillside amphitheater above the town.  Blessed by the pastor, who was already talking about them having kids, the future looks bright for these two who are joining the narrative right on time.

Can I celebrate this marriage while also critiquing how much we celebrate marriage? Continue reading “Wedding Legos”

Cage-Free

I was a little wary when I dozed off with a spider on the wall but when I woke to find it crawling on me.  Panic.  Get it off. I can’t think straight with this thing on me.

Only when I get some distance can I see the benefits of its fly-catching webs, and can begin to imagine living symbiotically, me and the spider, the spider and me.

I was born into the church and chose the church but then I woke up to find the church under my skin.

I’ve spent this year writing in frustration about that big bad wolf outside of me, but at some point I have to admit the wolf lives in me, and that’s why it bothers me so much.  If I were immune to its power I would be indifferent and have no reason to write about it.

Find and Replace

Unlike old typewriters, modern writing software has a “find and replace” feature that can search for any word (for example, “Indian”) and update it with different words (“Native American”).

As I look back on my writing this year, I could surely use such a feature to replace each complaint about the “church” with “that churchy part of me”.

Here’s an example: “How could the church be so sure about everything?” (see more on this) to “How could that churchy part of me be so sure about everything?”

Or, “How could I let that churchy part of me have such a big say?”

Or simply, “Why didn’t I ask more questions?”

I am finally learning to do this at the doctor’s office, so why not in life?  How many times have we taken a family member to the doctor for some minor thing, accepted the doctor’s first diagnosis and left with some ointment and bandaids only to get home wondering if we can get it wet or how we’ll know if it’s healed?

I think we have some implicit trust that the doctor has told us everything we need to know.

Trust

It’s time to start trusting that my questions are an elemental part of the doctor-patient relationship.  (In fact the doctor expects this, and if they don’t, it’s time to find a new doctor.)

I’m going to try writing more from myself, making honest art and making art honest.  But even if I don’t, the reader can know that whoever I am angrily writing about is triggering some part of me I wish weren’t there.

I want to write a letter of peace but the frustration seizes my fingers.  This year I am learning to write out the frustration in order to find the letters of peace underneath.

Writing has been so beneficial to get this out, to point the finger without actually poking.  All along I’ve wondered whether to mail this letter or just keep writing the letter over and over, until finally the letter itself changes.

Defining and discussing frustrations puts them in their place.  Instead of keeping faith in a narrow box with frustrations swirling around – let’s turn the tables by putting frustrations in a box, and letting the joy run wild. Instead of keeping the chickens in a cage so the wolves of the world can’t get them, let’s put the wolves in a cage and let the chickens run wild.

Cage-free, baby.

♦ weekendswell ♦

For a new vision of church-to-world, see A Wasteful Embrace.  Click Follow to be notified of future updates

Featured image by Dave Morrow, see more work at DaveMorrowPhotography

Ulysses Pact

As Ulysses sailed into the straights known for its seductive Siren songs, he was prepared.  Homer’s Odyssey details the resolve Ulysses took to stay the course – being rope-tied to the mast and stuffing wax into his crew’s ears, lest they hear the beauty of the voices around them and change course.

13_homer_wyeth_sirens
N.C. Wyeth illustration from a 1929 edition of The Odyssey.

One modern take on this story is a “Ulysses Pact” —  medical slang for an advance directive:  I instruct my future doctor to ignore my future wishes, trusting my current health and information is the best I’ll ever have.

A Ulsysses Pact approach is very useful for avoiding temptation – If I were trying to kick alcohol I would make a plan to avoid happy hour situations, knowing when I got there my resolve would go up in flames faster than liquor on bananas flambé. If a friend were thinking of cheating on his spouse I could recall to him the wedding vows made, (maybe put blinders on his wandering eyes?).¹

But should we follow the pact for interpreting how our faith interacts with the world? 

Adaptability

When technology, science, medicine, art, travel and globalization continue to give us more information about the earth we live on, our understanding of God’s mysteries evolve and so must our faith.  This adaptability – letting the interpretation change while keeping the main thing as the main thing – has been one of the keys to Christianity’s survival all these centuries.

Temptations aside, making a Ulysses Pact with our course of faith can be stunting.  With wax in the crews’ ears, we cannot hear or take in new information – our beliefs are set and that’s that.

Shoving my ears with wax means choosing to become tone-deaf to the world around me.

To put it another way, shoving my ears with wax means choosing to become tone-deaf to the world around me. Ostensibly, to protect myself.  Afraid of being swayed by their words, the wax means I can no longer hear that my own words now sound disparate to the next generation.

Into this exact mindset walked Jesus, two thousand years ago.

The religious of that time had set their minds on God’s kingdom, and, picturing just how it would look, shut their eyes tight in order to stay the course.²

So how do we remain open to new information when we already, “know what we know”?

Pursuit of Truth

Here’s a crazy suggestion:  look to the scientific method.

Brian McLaren makes a great case for religious communities to learn a lesson from science that’s worth considering: “Science is deeply interested in facts – in determining them, organizing them, presenting them in an orderly way, and using them in practical ways.  Religion, we might say, does the same thing with beliefs: it determines what beliefs are acceptable, organizes them and presents them, and uses them in practical ways.”³

He goes on to say that science’s primary loyalty is to its method or practice, rather than the facts it currently proclaims.  It starts with a mystery, moves to hypothesis, and after experimentation and time, can be considered scientific fact and acted upon.   But notice:  if new evidence arrives that undermine accepted facts, there is room to incorporate new evidence, and emerge with conclusions that are even closer to the actual truth.

As opposed to putting fingers in our ears and saying, “Nah, nah, nah I can’t hear you.  But the Bible says it and that settles it.”

“Breaking up with old facts is hard to do…but doesn’t discredit science as being unfaithful to its tradition…[instead] it enhances credibility because of its relentless pursuit of truth…even to the point of overturning previously proclaimed certitudes.”³

Late to the party

But if learning from science sounds like something the church should never do, I would argue that we already do it, we’re just perpetually late to the party.  Well, first we deny there even is a party, then start listing all the dangerous things that could happen at the party, then through some emergency phone call step into the party and see that it’s not so bad, and at one point or another we call an uneasy truce with the party and finally come to recognize the image of God in the faces of those at the party.

The church survives by latching onto God’s big story and adapting itself to cultures, languages, and epochs, interpreting anew the powerful and innovative words of Jesus.

We must today acknowledge that we are, right here in our seats, living in a new culture and language, maybe even epoch, and begin the process of adapting.  God’s grace is too good to keep it all the same.

Even if we think we have agreed upon an answer, the scientific method asks us not to forget the questions.

♦ weekendswell ♦

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—————– Notes —————–

¹refer: an interesting post about Ulysses Pact as applied to overcoming temptation

²Since there were no movies to quote back then, maybe Jesus was making a Homer ear wax reference when he said, “For him who has ears to hear?” (c’mon, you know he would have been a movie quoter with that omni-memory)

³These quotes and paraphrased explanations come from The Great Spiritual Migration by Brian D McLaren, pages 35-38.  I would recommend this book to you.  As a start, hear him on this Nomad podcast  and then see if you are so excited that you can’t go back to sleep either.

I’m continuing to quote McLaren because I think he’s onto something, as usual about a decade earlier than the rest of us.  [remember how mind blowing, “A New Kind of Christian” was? (well at least the ideas in it, not the shabby fiction he wrapped it in).  He wrote it in 2001]

Source for N.C. Wyeth’s illustration of Ulysses at the mast: http://comicsbookstories.blogspot.com/2010/04/n_10.html